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How To Blog a Book

How To Blog a Book

How to Blog a Book

What holds most would-be authors back from publishing? It’s not a lack of writing talent. It’s not a lack of knowledge. And it’s definitely not a lack of desire.

If you ask most people why they haven’t finished their book, they’ll tell you they don’t have time.

We’re all busy people. You have clients to serve, a business to run, a family to care for. Not only that, but you’re spending time writing, marketing on social media, managing your team…the list is nearly endless.

When would you have time to write an entire book?

You’ve Probably Already Written It

It’s true. If you have a blog, and you’ve been maintaining it for more than a few months, then you very likely have already written all the content your book needs. All that remains is to organise and give it a light edit.

If you don’t have a blog (why not?), or your blog is young, blogging your book is even easier, since you can plan your content around your book topic.

Here’s how it works.

Think of your blog categories as sections, and each blog post as a chapter. You can loosely organise your book by sorting all your blog posts by category, then listing them in logical order. Your book may only contain a single category, or it might contain several. The choice is yours.

Remove self-serving, time sensitive, curated, or other content that doesn’t fit into a book. Remove the calls to action. It won’t make sense to promote your services or products—or worse, affiliate offers—within a book.

 Why you must Edit

What you’re left with is a rough draft of a book. All that remains is a few passes with your editor who you will have engaged for:

  1. Flow: Books should follow a logical path from one chapter to the next, so you’ll likely have to add or edit the beginnings and endings of your posts.
  2. Spelling, grammar and punctuation: Don’t skip this part. In fact, get someone else to do it. It’s too difficult to spot our own mistakes, and book readers are less forgiving than blog readers.
  3. Content: Enlist the help of a few friends or colleagues who you trust to share their honest opinion with you. Ask them to read through and note any content that is confusing, or that could be explained in greater detail.

That’s it! Revise, and you’re ready to publish.

 

 Think no one will read a book that’s repurposed from your blog?

Think again. Bloggers have used this method to write books for years, and some of them are spectacularly successful. Darren Rowse of ProBlogger.net fame wrote and published his wildly popular blogging guide based entirely on content he’d already published on his blog. He found that even though the content was freely available, people bought the book because they wanted the convenience of having it organized for them in one document.

Even fiction writers have discovered the power of blogging a book. Andy Weir, the author of “The Martian,” first published his book one chapter at a time on a blog.

Don’t continue to let excuses hold you back from publishing your book. Use the content you’ve already written, or strategically plan your blog to turn it into a book, but either way, get publishing!

 

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Self-Doubt Thrives When You Compare Yourself to Other Writers

Self-Doubt Thrives When You Compare Yourself to Other Writers

 Have you ever finished a wonderful book that, when you put it down, only left you feeling full of self-doubt? Because you think you’ll never write that well? Repeat after me 😊 I will never do this again! Comparing yourself to other writers can only damage your future successes. You may not be at the same experience level of those you’re comparing yourself to, and another person’s success may not be the magical transformation you feel it will be. 

 It’s not magic

Self-doubt can arise from the comparisons you make between you and fellow writers. Some may seem to have the Midas touch no matter what genre they write in–but you don’t know how many rewrites and edits they put that work through before it hit the bookshelves. 

 Those writers who are successful have likely spent an enormous amount of time and effort on their writing. It may look easy, but chances are they went through the same self-doubting process about their own potential for success. 

 Fear of exposure

Comparison to others and the self-doubt that follows goes on in every business – but it’s more prevalent in writing because you’re always putting yourself out there, presenting yourself and your ideas to others, particularly your friends and family (why do we feel more nervous about this audience?). They’ve been hearing for a long time about your writing, now they will see for themselves how good (or not) you are. 

The massive and constant success of others can make you feel like such a failure–because someone is always making more money than you or seems to be successful with everything they publish. 

Defeat the comparisons 

Comparisons like that are treacherous to your own self-confidence and can defeat what you’re trying to accomplish. You may not be aware of their many unfinished novels in the past or of how much time and money they’ve spent getting to this point. 

One way to view comparisons is to see them as challenges. “If she can do it, so can I!” may be exactly the boost you need to act, and make your own dreams come true. Note also that success for writers in the 21st Century is as much about marketing as it is about writing. Educate yourself on the strategies used by successful writers to get book sales.

 Strategise

Competition is fierce among writers. Looking into the strategies of other writers can be a good thing if you use them as models rather than comparing yourself to them negatively.  

Self-doubt can grow to be the nemesis of your future. Guard against comparing yourself to others negatively and focus on getting your writing to be the best it can be.

 

If you struggle with self-doubt why not join me for a 21-day Stop Thinking, Start Writing challenge 

Starts 22 February 2021

Gather Pinterest Followers in 5 Easy Steps

It’s relatively easy to gather followers on Pinterest, much easier than other social media platforms. 

1. Post Original Pins

The first step in gathering followers on Pinterest is to post original Pins. Now, this can get people in a tizzy. I didn’t understand what it meant when I started taking Pinterest seriously–I thought it meant that every Pin I created had to be designed by me. Not so. Original merely means you are not saving from another Pinner’s account.

Sharing from another website, a funny quote or meme, your own original images (high quality) and best of all, Infographics. In 2020, everyone devours bite-sized information and you can’t get better than an infographic.  See opposite!

2. Save Pins from Other Pinners

Don’t forget to follow the Pinner if you’re saving their stuff. You don’t have to, but 9 times out of 10, they will follow you back.

Change the description of the Pin, creating something unique to you. 

3. Use Keywords

Use the Search Bar to find out what other people are searching for and then use that information to inform your keyword selection. This will find people who are looking for what you’re putting out.

4. Connect to Your Other Social Media Accounts

Connect your Pinterest account to as many of your other social media accounts as you can. In that way, you can share your Pins and get more followers that way.

5. Make Your Website Pinterest-friendly

Make sure your website visitors can pin directly from your website by adding Follow and Share Pinterest buttons (and any other Social Media accounts you may have). I use BestWebSoft’s Pinterest plugin which is extremely simple to navigate.

Also, don’t forget to activate your Pinterest Conversion Tag if you have a Business Account (and if you haven’t, why not?). For this, you can use a plugin called Pctags – Pinterest Conversion Tags 

One last thing – Pinterest is unique in social media platforms in that you can almost instantly see results IF you put in the work. Like Jim Carey said when he wrote himself a $10m cheque – there was no point in writing it and then going off to eat ice cream 🙂

 

 

Pinterest for authors, Pinterest for Artists

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How to Schedule your Pins on Pinterest with Tailwind

If you’re regularly posting to social media sites the idea of having to post to yet another could be what stops you making the most of Pinterest. However, it doesn’t have to be like that. Serious Pinners use Tailwind, a pin scheduler for both Pinterest and Instagram (separate subscriptions).

Firstly, with Pinterest, the slicker your photos look, the better they will perform. Instagram is where you can post your own images that may not have turned out quite right but on Pinterest, you need hiRes and interesting images relating to your product/s.  Check out best practices for both platforms before posting.

SmartLoop your Pins

Apart from scheduling pins for a day/week/month ahead, Tailwind also has a nifty little feature whereby you can loop your images. For example, say one of your pins from last month or year performed extremely well, you can go add it to SmartLoop and it will be published again. You can add Pins straight from your boards so you never need to run out of material.  The image opposite is my SmartLoop Schedule

Just make sure each image is linked back to a landing page or your shop or wherever you want people to go.

Each Board a Pin is set to Loop to counts as 1 Active SmartLoop Post regardless of how often it actually Pins each month*

Tailwind Create

The latest innovation from Tailwind (they innovate a lot) is called Tailwind Create. You set up your account with your brand colours, logo and fonts and every time you create a new Pin, your settings are automatically applied.

Join a Tribe

Another cool thing about this App is the Tribes function. You can find tribes in over 4,000 niches and of course, because Pinterest is full of curated content, you’ll be able to find lots of content to repin.

You can use Tailwind Tribes for free, even if you don’t have a paid account, and your free trial has ended. When you sign up for a Tailwind Free Trial, you get 100 free scheduling timeslots with NO time limit! 

All of these are free to join, the monthly charges are low but not necessary to get you started.

This is the pricing page

Don’t forget – if you have a business you should have a business account. Check out my last post to see how you can convert your personal account to a business account.

*source Tailwind

“This post contains affiliate links, meaning that if you choose to click through and make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no cost to you. I was also compensated to create this post, though all opinions are my own.”

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Convert a Personal Pinterest Page to a Business Pinterest Page

If you’re an author who sells (or wants to sell) books you are a business and therefore you need a Business account on Pinterest.

It’s not that difficult to do but you may not know where to start, so that’s why I’ve created a PDF that shows you step-by-step how to go about changing a Personal account to a Business account on Pinterest. Simply enter your email address opposite to download. 

If you have a go at creating your Business account I’ll share information with you next time about how you can keep a steady stream of pins to your boards.

NOTE: When you’re creating boards for your page, whether it’s Business or Personal, use your brand colours when designing the covers – see below (or visit my Pinterest page at https://www.pinterest.ie/norahdeay/_saved/) – more on this here

A Pinterest business page
Writers need a Pinterest Business account

Pinterest personal to business account

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